Webinar Archive

Watch recordings of previous webinars.

Webinar: How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaster

Join EAB University for their Fall 2016 webinar series.

John Ball from South Dakota State University will be discussing "How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaster".

Learn more here!

Webinar: Characteristics of Trees Used to Replacement Ash

Join EAB University for their Fall 2016 Webinar Series.

Bob Schutzki from Michigan State University will kick off the series with "Characteristics of Trees Used to Replacement Ash"

Learn more here!

Webinar: The heat is on: What record heat and a warming world mean for insect outbreaks

After a summer set to shatter records, we will see how warmer temperatures can alter ranges of pests, seasonal phenology of insects and mites, and interactions among plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies. Special emphasis will be placed on urban heat islands in the baking summer of 2016.

To attend, visit  www.joinwebinar.com and enter the ID code 471-645-275

This broadcast is free and will offer the opportunity for arborists to earn 1.0 ISA CEU and 0.5 MCA credit.

This webinar is part of the Urban Forestry Today 2016 Webcast Series. This series is sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Conservation, in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, University of Massachusetts Extension, and Massachusetts Tree Wardens' & Foresters' Association. 

Check out previous webinars here.

Municipal Tree Care and Management in the U.S.

September 29, 1-2pm

Join the Alliance for Community Trees' webinar as we hear Dr. Rich Hauer explain this special report that influences how we look at trees in communities. Trees are a recognized and significant asset to communities. For community trees to remain an asset and to increase in value they need care and regular maintenance. The Municipal Tree Care and Management in the United States: A 2014 Urban and Community Forestry Census of Tree Activities is the fifth report over 40 years that addresses the many approaches communities take to manage public trees. It has been over 20 years since the last rendition in 1993. Over 667 communities provided data for this project.

Register here!

Webinar: The Science and Practice of Cabling and Bracing

In the Arboriculture/Urban Forestry profession, many are familiar with the practice of cabling and bracing to help provide support and stability for overextended and weakly attached limbs. Join Mark Reiland as he outlines the fundamentals, and provides an update about emerging knowledge, pertaining to the science and practice of cabling and bracing.

To attend, visit www.joinwebinar.com and enter the ID code: 116-178-939. 

This broadcast is free and will offer the opportunity for arborists to earn 1.0 ISA CEU and 0.5 MCA credit.

This webinar is part of the Urban Forestry Today 2016 Webcast Series. This series is sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Conservation, in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, University of Massachusetts Extension, and Massachusetts Tree Wardens' & Foresters' Association. 

Check out previous webinars here.

Webinar: Roots, Trees, and the Urban Environment: A Continuing Discussion

Roughly 80 percent of urban tree health problems originate from conditions below ground. A tree is supported both structurally and nutritionally by its roots, and any limitations placed thereon will result, directly or indirectly, in future health problems. Join Taryn Bauerle, as she outlines what we have discovered - and don't yet know - about the occurrences related to tree roots in the urban environment.

Our presenter is Taryn Bauerle, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Horticulture at Cornell University. Her overall research interests lie in woody root physiological ecology. Primarily, her lab works on examining root morphological and physiological response to abiotic and biotic stressors. The majority of her research deals with growth and physiological responses of plants to water deficits under both greenhouse and field conditions. She is interested in the integration of whole plant water status in relation to soil and root demographics with root physiological characteristics at the individual root level. Taryn aims to use basic research to address industry pertinent issues, such as stress caused by a limited water supply and fine root responses to herbivore pressures.

*Due to technical difficulties during our broadcast, we have archived the same broadcast recorded in January 2016 from our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts.

Webinar: Green Infrastructure Benefits for Climate Change Adaptation and Health

The Green Infrastructure Collaborative and the Department of Health are proud to sponsor Green Infrastructure Benefits for Climate Change Adaptation and Health on March 3rd, 2016 at 12 pm EST (noon).

Jared Ulmer will be presenting research on the health impacts of heat islands in Vermont and how green infrastructure can help mitigate both climate change and heat island impacts. Draft agenda below. Pre-register for the webinar here.

Agenda:

1. Intro to green infrastructure’s impact on:

  • climate change mitigation
  • human health promotion
  • potential health concerns

2. Overview of urban heat island effect
3. Findings from analysis of heat island impacts on health in Vermont

  • Overview of heat-related health impacts in Vermont
  • Future expectations for heat-related illness & mortality
  • Urban v. rural heat-related health impacts
  • Thermal analysis of urban heat islands in Vermont

4. Next steps for research & practice

Managing diverse viewpoints: Decision-making and best practices on volunteer boards

Urban trees provide a multitude of benefits to citizens, businesses, and visitors alike. Beyond the aesthetic values, trees also provide practical and environmental benefits, and economic value, about which many communities are unaware. With only three Vermont towns that have arborists on staff, many towns rely on volunteer tree boards or conservation commissions to guide direction of local urban and community forestry programs.  

Citizen-powered boards, committees, and commissions are an invaluable resource to Vermont cities and towns; they are often tasked with coordination, advocacy, and raising awareness about relevant community issues, such as the management and cultivation of a healthy public tree population.  However, these groups often comprise individuals with varying, and sometimes conflicting, viewpoints. Join us for our February webinar to understand common - and unique - challenges of viewpoint diversity and to explore a variety of best practices for managing conflict and making group decisions. This presentation may be particularly useful to municipal board, committee, and commission members, especially those that make decisions concerning natural resources and public trees, and the Vermont Tree Wardens who work with them.  

Our presenter is Emily Silver Huff, Research Forester with the USDA Forest Service and adjunct faculty member at the University of Massachusetts. Emily holds a Ph.D. in Forestry from the University of Maine, specializing in human dimensions of forestry, and a M.S. in Forest Management from the University of Minnesota. She is currently part of the Family Forest Research Center where she works on the National Woodland Owner Survey and related efforts to better understand the decisions of private forest landowners nationwide. Her work uses mixed methods including large-scale surveys, in-depth interview techniques, and focus groups. She has worked with inter-group dynamics and decision-making processes on several projects including a new national effort to better understand urban residential landowners' attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions of their green space and trees

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