Webinar Archive

Watch recordings of previous webinars.

Emerald Ash Borer Preparedness & Management for VT Communities

Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in northern Orange Country in February 2018. This webinar will focus on the resources available and steps your town can take to reduce the impact of EAB when it reaches your community. Vermont Urban & Community Forestry Program staff will provide an EAB update and Geoff Beyer, tree warden and Parks & Trees Director for the City of Montpelier, will discuss their planning process and strategies for EAB management.  We will also be joined by Andy Hillman from the Davey Resource Group, who has worked with a number of New York communities of various sizes to manage for EAB and will share his experiences and lessons learned. This webinar is intended for municipal staff, Selectboard members, Conservation Commission and Tree Committee members, and anyone else engaged in planning for EAB at the local level.

Questions, contact Elise Schadler.

Webinar: Urban Wood Utilization: Options and Alternatives

With the presence of invasive insects and urban tree decline and mortality, there is much concern related to the large volume of wood that may be generated as a result of tree removals.

Join Sean Mahoney, Wood Utilization Forester, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) in the second of this two-part series, as he outlines the options and practices communities and professionals may consider when it comes to capitalizing on their urban wood resources.  

To attend Part 2, visit  www.joinwebinar.com and enter the ID code 167-428-923.

These broadcasts are free and will each offer the opportunity for arborists to earn 1.0 ISA CEU and 0.5 MCA credit. For those who are unavailable to attend the live broadcasts, sessions will be archived in the "videos" section at www.urbanforestrytoday.org

Webinar: How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaster

Join EAB University for their Fall 2016 webinar series.

John Ball from South Dakota State University will be discussing "How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaster".

Learn more here!

Webinar: Characteristics of Trees Used to Replacement Ash

Join EAB University for their Fall 2016 Webinar Series.

Bob Schutzki from Michigan State University will kick off the series with "Characteristics of Trees Used to Replacement Ash"

Learn more here!

Webinar: The heat is on: What record heat and a warming world mean for insect outbreaks

After a summer set to shatter records, we will see how warmer temperatures can alter ranges of pests, seasonal phenology of insects and mites, and interactions among plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies. Special emphasis will be placed on urban heat islands in the baking summer of 2016.

To attend, visit  www.joinwebinar.com and enter the ID code 471-645-275

This broadcast is free and will offer the opportunity for arborists to earn 1.0 ISA CEU and 0.5 MCA credit.

This webinar is part of the Urban Forestry Today 2016 Webcast Series. This series is sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Conservation, in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, University of Massachusetts Extension, and Massachusetts Tree Wardens' & Foresters' Association. 

Check out previous webinars here.

Municipal Tree Care and Management in the U.S.

September 29, 1-2pm

Join the Alliance for Community Trees' webinar as we hear Dr. Rich Hauer explain this special report that influences how we look at trees in communities. Trees are a recognized and significant asset to communities. For community trees to remain an asset and to increase in value they need care and regular maintenance. The Municipal Tree Care and Management in the United States: A 2014 Urban and Community Forestry Census of Tree Activities is the fifth report over 40 years that addresses the many approaches communities take to manage public trees. It has been over 20 years since the last rendition in 1993. Over 667 communities provided data for this project.

Register here!

Webinar: The Science and Practice of Cabling and Bracing

In the Arboriculture/Urban Forestry profession, many are familiar with the practice of cabling and bracing to help provide support and stability for overextended and weakly attached limbs. Join Mark Reiland as he outlines the fundamentals, and provides an update about emerging knowledge, pertaining to the science and practice of cabling and bracing.

To attend, visit www.joinwebinar.com and enter the ID code: 116-178-939. 

This broadcast is free and will offer the opportunity for arborists to earn 1.0 ISA CEU and 0.5 MCA credit.

This webinar is part of the Urban Forestry Today 2016 Webcast Series. This series is sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Conservation, in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, University of Massachusetts Extension, and Massachusetts Tree Wardens' & Foresters' Association. 

Check out previous webinars here.

Webinar: Roots, Trees, and the Urban Environment: A Continuing Discussion

Roughly 80 percent of urban tree health problems originate from conditions below ground. A tree is supported both structurally and nutritionally by its roots, and any limitations placed thereon will result, directly or indirectly, in future health problems. Join Taryn Bauerle, as she outlines what we have discovered - and don't yet know - about the occurrences related to tree roots in the urban environment.

Our presenter is Taryn Bauerle, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Horticulture at Cornell University. Her overall research interests lie in woody root physiological ecology. Primarily, her lab works on examining root morphological and physiological response to abiotic and biotic stressors. The majority of her research deals with growth and physiological responses of plants to water deficits under both greenhouse and field conditions. She is interested in the integration of whole plant water status in relation to soil and root demographics with root physiological characteristics at the individual root level. Taryn aims to use basic research to address industry pertinent issues, such as stress caused by a limited water supply and fine root responses to herbivore pressures.

*Due to technical difficulties during our broadcast, we have archived the same broadcast recorded in January 2016 from our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts.

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