Public Places Awards

VT UCF is proud to be a partner in sponsoring Vermont's Public Places Awards. This awards program recognizes special public spaces, the corridors that connect them, or networks of public spaces which have been defined or enriched by planning or design, as well as regulations that promote positive public uses and benefits.

Nominations are due January 26, 2017.

Nomination for 2016/2017 Awards  

The 2014/2015 Vermont Public Places Awards Winners

Vermont Public Places Honor Awards 

City Hall Park, Burlington – City of Burlington, Burlington City Arts, Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architecture, Lincoln Brown.

Middlebury Riverfront Park, Middlebury – Town of Middlebury, LandWorks, Civil Engineering Associates, Marble Works Partnership.

Open Space Report, South Burlington – City of South Burlington, South Burlington Open Space Committee, T. J. Boyle Associates, Front Porch Planning & Design.

The Vermont Downtown Action Team – Vermont Department of Housing & Community Development, City of Barre, Town of Brandon, Town of Brattleboro, Town of Northfield, Town of Waitsfield, Town of Warren, Town of Waterbury and Town of Wilmington.

Waterbury State Office Complex Redevelopment Project – Waterbury – State of Vermont, Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services, Freeman French Freeman, Goody Clancy, SE Group, Engineering Ventures, Rist-Frost-Shumway.

Vermont Public Places Merit Awards 

Barre Main Street Reconstruction, Barre – City of Barre, Vermont Agency of Transportation, Barre Partnership, Luck Brothers, Hutch Brothers, Moulison North, Pike Industries, Lafayette Highway Specialties, James Lamontagne Landscape, Vermont Siteworks.

Granite Zipper Pocket Park, Barre – Studio Place Arts, Chris Miller, Dew Corporation, Swenson Granite Company/Rock of Ages, Vermont Community Foundation.

Wright Mountain/Devils Den Town Forest, Bradford – Town of Bradford, Bradford Conservation Commission.

Ripples, Rings & Photons, Burlington – Dealer.com, Terra | Logic Landscape Architecture, Kate Pond.

One Taylor Street: Montpelier Transit Center, Montpelier – City of Montpelier, Redstone, Gossens Bachman Architects, Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architecture, Dubois & King.

South Burlington City Center- Market Street, South Burlington – City of South Burlington, SE Group, VHB, Shole Systems Design.

Springfield Hospital Centennial Garden – Springfield, Springfield Medical Care Systems, Terrigenous, Engineering Ventures, Woodbury’s, Gurney Brothers.

Barnes Camp Restoration, Stowe – Lamoille County Planning Commission, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation, Vermont Agency of Transportation, Stowe Mountain Resort, Green Mountain Club, Robert Carl Williams Associates, Jay White, Upland Construction.

Woodstock Elementary School Learning Landscape Project, Woodstock – Woodstock Elementary School, Jack Rossi Landscape Architecture, Natural Playground Company, Jason Drebitko.

Past Corridors and Commons Recipients

2010 Winners

The Town of Swanton
Fit and Healthy Recreation Path
Submitted by Ron Kilburn – Swanton Zoning Administrator and President of Swanton Historical Society

Partners: Northwestern Medical Center, Vermont Department of Health, Vermont Agency of Transportation, Swanton School, Swanton Recreation Commission, Swanton Historical Society, Swanton Teen Center, Swanton Village

Almost 12 years ago, the community of Swanton had a vision - offer a link through the village to provide a safe route to school, physical activity and connection to the area's natural, cultural and historical resources. A logical corridor already existed in the community- a historic railroad that once led from Swanton to St. Johnsbury. The railroad was abandoned in 1970’s. Following the abandonment, a tragic fire burned the longest covered railroad bridge in the country; leaving no way for pedestrians or bicyclists to cross the Missisquoi River from South River Street into the Village.

With the help of the Swanton Fit Family Coalition, formed in 2007, and the Swanton Advisory Board, the vision began to take form with the proposal of a one mile community path along the existing railroad bed from one end of the village, past two elementary schools, the recreation fields, a protected wetland, the village square and across the river where it would meet with the Champlain Bikeway. The challenges were also real: the rail bed was overgrown and there was no way to cross the river. With the help of the Town and many community volunteers (youth and adults), a majority of the abandoned rail bed was redeveloped into a fit and healthy community path in 2008.

But they still needed a way to cross the river: luckily with the help of the Agency of Transportation, a solution was already in the works. A circa 1903 truss bridge in Milton needed a new home. After securing funding and completing the restoration, the historic bridge was in place and open for use in the spring of 2009. The bridge now links the downtown area with the Swanton Historical Society Railroad Depot Museum, which offers insight into the past with a caboose, a railroad bridge house and the remains of a roundhouse

To celebrate the completion of the path, the community gathered on September 23, 2009, to participate in the first ‘All School Walk to the Depot’ along the recreation path. Over 500 elementary students participated. Since its opening, the path continues to be utilized by students, individuals and families. The path provides permanent public access to this wonderful community resource and in the distance, the sounds of today’s trains can be heard using their new corridor.

Honorable Mentions:

Island Pond Lakeside Park Improvement Study
Village of Island Pond, VT
Patrick McLean – Stantec who partnered with the Town of Brighton

The Village of Island Pond features one of Vermont’s few commercial downtowns located along a waterfront. As the Village has become increasingly more popular for lake-based ‘adventure tourism’ such as canoeing, snowmobiling, and other activities, residents and local business owners recognized a need to more explicitly connect the lake to the village core – the hub of the economy and community. This project is a study on how to connect these two hubs: beginning with the development and improvement plan for the Lakeside Park and its function as the link between the downtown and the natural beauty of the water.

The planning effort involved soliciting input from business owners, town and village officials and the community at large on strategies for integrating the commercial downtown with the waterfront and for making better use of the park through the year. From this information, the project design team has developed three concept plans for improving the park, which involved various combinations of streetscape connections, active recreation, access and parking for boats, snowmobiles and bicycles, an amphitheater, a marina and other open areas and pathways linking visitors to the village center.

At the heart of the improvement plan is a series of connections between the park, the village, and the lake. Green corridors carry you from one common to the next.

This is just the beginning; the village hopes to inspire a reinvigorated village center that serves as a regional draw for recreation and nature tourism as well as a sense of pride for its residents. We look forward to seeing the plan come to reality and carrying the natural beauty of the area to the village center.

Along the Connecticut River
Windsor, Vermont
Robert D. Haight who partnered with the Windsor Downtown Committee

Along the Connecticut River is a conceptual plan to develop a trail that connects the town of Windsor’s natural beauty to its history and life today. At the north end of the trail is the commercial and industrial hub created when Simon Pearce Glass invested to Windsor. Today there is also Harpoon Brewery, Paradise Sports, and Great Water Outfitters. 3 ½ miles to the south, the trail brings you another hub, downtown Windsor and provides access to the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge, the grounds of the former Tewsbury organic gardens at the mouth of the Mill Brook. About equal distance to the north from Simon Pearce Glass are the towns of Hartland, North Hartland, and White River Junction. In between, path travelers, whether walking, biking or skiing, can traverse virtually unspoiled sections of the river and active farming. This path creates an opportunity to appreciate and witness the Windsor are by providing insights into reality, if ever, seen by residents or by visitors - all through a corridor connecting various community hubs. The symbolic relationship between the trail and the local efforts of the town of Windsor is very important. Bringing new activity and awareness to the area will help the community. The visibility and connection to other areas and other activities will create a completely new perspective of Windsor.

2008 Winner

The City of Winooski received the 2008 Corridors and Commons Award for their Champlain Mill River Walk. Beginning in the most densely populated square mile of Vermont, the Champlain Mill RiverWalk seamlessly connects Winooski’s flourishing urban landscape to a 100-acre natural area comprised of old farmland, flood plains and wildlife habitat.

Partners

PLANT. LIVE. GROW.